Carla Fried

Carla translates business and personal finance concepts into engaging content that helps individuals make more confident choices in how they manage their money. Her work appears in The New York Times, Money Magazine, Barron's and Consumer Reports.


Articles by Carla Fried

Health Insurance

Employers and Healthcare: How Employers Can Contribute to Employees Health Care

When it comes to benefits, employees clearly place maximum value on health-care-related programs. In a recent survey by Metlife, employees rated health insurance, prescription drug coverage, and dental insurance as their top three must-have benefits, relegating a retirement savings plan to fourth place.

4 min read

Retirement

I just turned 65 - how does that affect my HSA?

Turning 65 brings some big changes for retirees and near-retirees. At age 65 you become eligible for Medicare, and if you’ve been saving for retirement using an HSA, some key rule changes also kick in.

3 min read

Health Savings Accounts

Is my HSA tax-deductible?

If you have an HSA, you've probably heard about multiple different tax savings. Does that mean that your HSA is tax-deductible?

Short answer: Yes, your contributions to a Health Savings Account (HSA) are tax-deductible under certain circumstances.

2 min read

Health Savings Accounts

IRA to HSA: The Benefits of a One-Time Transfer

If you have a health savings account (HSA) and a traditional Individual Retirement Account (IRA), you can take advantage of a nifty tax break. You are allowed a one-time opportunity to move money from a traditional IRA —where it will be eventually taxed—into an HSA where you can use the money tax free for qualified medical expenses.

2 min read

Retirement

Maxing Out: Which retirement account should I max out first?

You may have a workplace retirement account such as an 401(k) or 403(b), an individual retirement account (IRA) you have parked at a brokerage, and if you have a health savings account (HSA) you can also use that as a stealth retirement plan.

4 min read

Health Savings Accounts

What is an HSA "Catch-Up" Contribution?

Every dollar you save in a Health Savings Account (HSA) gives you three valuable tax breaks. Contributions you make this year to an HSA reduce your taxable income reported to the IRS. There is no annual tax bill on money that remains in your HSA account. When you withdraw money from an HSA — it can be next week or 30 years from now —— you will not owe any tax as long as the money is used to pay a qualified medical expense.

2 min read